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Detroit Lions

Seahawks’ Pete Carroll Blames Miscommunication For Losing Golden Tate

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When it comes to wide receiver Golden Tate, who currently plays for the Detroit Lions, Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll seems to be regretful on how the team handled his free agency during 2014. Tate, who previously played for the Seahawks, has thrived in Detroit, the team he signed with during that free agency period.

“We did try to bring him back,” Carroll said in a conference call with Detroit reporters. “We made an offer that didn’t get communicated really well at the time, and I think he’s a terrific player. I loved him on our team, but you can’t keep everybody, and so during the process of the negotiations, he went elsewhere.

“But our players and our coaches, we think the world of him, and he’s fun to watch. We watch him every week, and we’ll have a good time competing against him.”

When Tate was asked about the free agency process of 2014 he said; “happened so quick I don’t even know. Maybe that is what happened but I don’t know.”

The Lions eventually inked Tate to a five-year, $31 million deal with an $8 million signing bonus and he has been worth every penny. Tate is coming off his 3rd straight 90+ reception season and while he has not found the end zone as much as those numbers may suggest, he has topped 1,000 yards receiving two out of his three seasons in Detroit.

During his tenure with Seattle, Tate never topped more than 64 receptions or 898 yards receiving.

Tate said he thought the Seahawks wanted him to return. Many fans and perhaps the organization expected Tate to take less money to stay with the team he had just won a Super Bowl championship with.

“I thought they wanted me back. I thought I did everything I could to help them win a Super Bowl, was in the community, was a good guy,” he said. “But you know, it worked out. I’m happy where I am and excited about the future of this organization and hopefully I’m here for a long, long time.”

Carroll admitted that he was bothered by how Seattle handled the negotiations, mainly the communication, with Tate, feeling that the team’s interest in re-signing the wideout was not properly conveyed.

“I don’t remember those numbers at the time, but I’ll just tell you this: There was a time that Golden didn’t know that we made him an offer and he thought we didn’t, and that’s because it wasn’t communicated,” Carroll said. “I just felt bad about that. I don’t even know what the numbers were at the time, but that wasn’t even the point. We were interested in bringing him back and he didn’t get that sense from us, and I was disappointed in that.

“They were going to go higher than we were able to go anyway, and I just think the world of him. That’s my opinion of it, and at this point, I could care less about it.”

With any free-agent departure, there usually seems  to be some level of backlash. Tate said the only backlash he has received from Seahawks fans are those who he referred to as “ignorant people.”

“From very ignorant people but anyone who has had an encounter with me or spent time with me and actually researched who I am as a person, I still get support,” he said.

“A lot of people reached out on my social media who are Seahawks fans and said, ‘Hey, you are my favorite player. I’m excited to see you come back to town. Unfortunately I’m going to have to root for the Seahawks but I’ll be wearing your Seattle jersey.’ It’s always good to have somewhat of a legacy like that.”

Anthony DiMoro is the creator of Sports Rants and the CEO of Elite Rank Media and DiMoro Enterprises LLC. He is a former Contributor for Forbes and the Huffington Post where he covered sports, social media, and SEO. Anthony hosts the Anthony DiMoro Show podcast, and formerly hosted the 'Forbes SportsMoney Podcast'.

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Detroit Lions

Former Lions’ Wide Receiver Charles Rogers Dies at 38

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Charles Rogers

Former Detroit Lions wide receiver and the second overall pick of the 2003 NFL Draft Charle Rogers passed away at the age of 38, according to the Detroit Free Press’ Chris Solari.

Rogers entered the NFL following a brilliant career at Michigan State, however injuries derailed what was a promising career, as Rogers played in just 15 games with the Lions over 3 seasons.

Rogers suffered a broken collarbone twice, and later admitted that he became addicted to Vicdin while he was playing with the Lions, according to the Lansing State Journal.

Rogers also had issues with alcohol and marijuana, saying that he smoked marijuana every day while at Michigan State and during his NFL career as well.

Rogers continued to have issues following his NFL career, with issues with the law as well as substance abuse.

Rogers died Monday from liver failure, according to his former Saginaw High coaches (h/t MLive.com).

“I called his mom at the hospital over the weekend and got a chance to talk to Charles,” former Saginaw High football coach Don Durrett said. “He said he was going to the Lord.”

“He had cancer, whether that was related to his liver I don’t know,” former Saginaw High basketball coach and athletic director Marshall Thomas said. “They had given him 30 days to live if he didn’t get a liver transplant.”

Rogers also battled cancer.

 

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Detroit Lions

Seahawks Acquire Quandre Diggs

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Quandre Diggs

The Seattle Seahawks made a move to bolster their defense on Tuesday by acquiring veteran safety Quandre Diggs from the Detroit Lions via trade, according to ESPN’s Michael Rothstein.

Diggs, 26, was a Pro Bowl alternate last year after posting a breakout season for the Lions in which he collected 78 tackles, three interceptions, and eight passes defended.

The Lions will receiver a 2021 seventh round pick and a 2020 fifth round draft pick from the Seahawks as part of the deal for Diggs.

Diggs took to Instagram to thank his former Lions’ teammates, many of whom took to social media to express their shock, and his excitement to join the Seahawks saying “Seattle let’s get it!! Ready to get to work and win more games!! Too hyped!!”

Detroit will now turn to to rookie Will Harris at safety to replace Diggs, alongside Tracy Walker.

Diggs was popular with both players and with fans, and this trade marks the second straight year that the Lions have traded a popular player. Last year, they dealt wide receiver Golden Tate to the Philadelphia Eagles for a third round pick.

Tate now plays for the New York Giants, who take on the Lions this Sunday.

 

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Detroit Lions

Calvin Johnson, Rob Sims Partner with Harvard in Marajuana/CTE Research

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Calvin Johnson

Former Detroit Lions wide receiver Calvin Johnson and his business partner, former NFL lineman Rob Sims, have partnered with Harvard University to research the benefits of medical marijuana in the areas of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and pain management, according to ESPN’s Michael Rothstein.

Johnson and Sims, who own the cannabis company Primitive, announced the partnership that includes a sizeable donation of six-figures with an option for future money, to the International Phytomedicines and Medical Cannabis Institute at Harvard on Tuesday during the Cannabis Capital Conference in Detroit, Michigan.

“We can be in position to develop a treatment for CTE,” Sims said, according to ESPN’s report. “There’s been suggestion that CBD [cannabidiol, a compound in cannabis] and stuff can help cognitive disease, and we think that potentially there could be a treatment going forward that we can produce.”

“As being former athletes, we know there’s some sort of CTE or some sort of damage, 99% I think they say in the study,” Sims said. “So that means I may be walking around with some form of it. It’s really about the hope. Just providing hope, improving the game, making the game safer for former players after they are done.

“Really just being able to help people. I’m a second-generation NFL kid; both my father and father-in-law [played]. I’ve seen the good, the bad and the ugly of what it looks like when you’re done playing ball. If we can help this facet of people suffering from CTE or other cognitive disease, that’s the real goal here.”

Harvard will perform medical research for Primitive, which will see them run clinical trials related to CTE and pain management, as well as provide quality assurance from Harvard Medical School for any products the company creates.

“As being former athletes, we know there’s some sort of CTE or some sort of damage, 99% I think they say in the study,” Sims said. “So that means I may be walking around with some form of it. It’s really about the hope. Just providing hope, improving the game, making the game safer for former players after they are done.

“Really just being able to help people. I’m a second-generation NFL kid; both my father and father-in-law [played]. I’ve seen the good, the bad and the ugly of what it looks like when you’re done playing ball. If we can help this facet of people suffering from CTE or other cognitive disease, that’s the real goal here.”

“What our mission is going to be is just to improve quality of life,” Sims said. “So, you know, with NESTRE and the brain training and the human optimization, we believe there’s a way to continue to improve your brain function through working out.

“Then, from our position, with that data that we’ll be able to gain, we believe that we can produce plant medicines, or cannabis, using nanotechnology to deliver payloads to areas where people would have symptoms of CTE, like mood and anxiety and memory loss. That’s the goal in the end.”

The group is hopeful that clinical trials can begin during the first quarter of 2020.

 

 

 

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